Dallas and The Gates

The City of Dallas’ transportation committee met, deliberated behind doors and then decided to push the Love Field Gate Issue up to the full city council yesterday.  I noticed that one particular person was involved in the hiring of L.E.K. Consulting to determine who should get the gates:  Aviation Director Mark Deubner

Deubner seems intent on making a hash of managing Dallas Love Field in ways that go beyond the norm for this day and age.  Deubner is the same person who made a hash of the negotiations surrounding the Braniff Maintenence and Operations building on Lemmon Avenue last year.   It’s become quite clear that Dallas Love Field won’t be thriving under this man’s direction.

I think that the City of Dallas getting involved in this issue is going to backfire on the city in ways that City Council Members can’t entirely imagine.  First and foremost, it’s unwise to interfere with the United States Justice Department and the disposition of antitrust issues.  Second, the City Council has no legal standing to determine who gets those gets short of crazy arriving on the door step.

And Virgin America getting those gates isn’t crazy.

If the cities of this country want to control their airports better and do more for their local citizens (aka The Consumers), then they need to stop making long term, exclusive leases on gate space.  Auction it off on short term leases or control it on a flight by flight basis.  Keep your flexibility and sell your city like nobody’s business.

But you don’t get to make deals and then revisit just part of them.  If the City of Dallas attempts to control who gets those gates under the present circumstances, they’ll be a part to several lawsuits in which the only sure loser will be the City of Dallas.  And it will cost the city millions of dollars with zero possibility of an outcome that benefits its citizens (aka The Consumers.)

In fact, when Aviation Director Mark Deubner hired L.E.K. Consulting, he exposed the city to a lawsuit right there.  He forced the city into taking a position by virtue of asking a consulting company to establish what was best for the city when the city didn’t have any business asking that question at this point.

So, now it is entirely possible that even if the Dallas City Council leaves the issue alone and permits the gates to be sub-leased, other airlines may well sue the city because it doesn’t fit anyone else’s notion of what should happen.

If Mark Deubner had left things alone and the City of Dallas had left things alone, they would have been fairly protected and any outcome would have at least benefited the citizens (aka The Consumers) marginally more than the present situation.  Neutrality was the smart play here.  And an abiding desire to interfere on the part of City Management has exposed Dallas to consequences that will cost a great deal of money.

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One Response to “Dallas and The Gates”

  1. Greg!!:):) LOVE IT!

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